THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT BE EXHIBITED

Intersectionality,
Art & Activism

The Revolution Will Not Be Exhibited was an Exhibition/Panel
Discussion/MFA Thesis about Intersectionality, Art and Activism
organized and moderated by Alejandro Salgado Cendales. It took place at
the Klapper Hall Gallery at Queens College, City University of New York
(CUNY), on March 28th of 2017.


Statement:

The discussion explored the concept of Intersectionality and its meaning from different perspectives (Queer, Feminist, Socialist, Racial, Indigenous, Chicanx) with the purpose of finding strategies to democratize the patriarchal structures of power and its institutions (Government, Academy, Museums, Art Galleries, etc.).

Questions:

What is the relationship between colonialism, capitalism, and patriarchy? Are they connected? Why are the social movements integrating intersectionality as part of their ideology? Why has been so hard the integration of this concept into society? Why social movements use art? Can activism be considered art? Must be addressed in a different mode to fit the category of art? What is the purpose of aestheticizing politics? If institutions that control art simultaneously legitimize the white bourgeois patriarchal hegemony of power, why do we want to work with them?
What is the role of the artist in society? What is the purpose of art? What is art? Is always better individuality and private rather than collectivity and commonality?

Description:

On the quest for answers, I transformed the gallery in a social sphere to link different social movements as well as diverse worlds: from academic and western, to indigenous and popular. The Revolution Will Not Be Exhibited was an act of epistemic disobedience to challenge the status quo and the imperialist epistemology of western society.

“Without a vibrant public sphere, democratic citizenship is impossible; there are no contexts to generate the kind of selfhood, friendship, power, and relations to the wider world that democracy demands.”[1]

[1] Nina Eliasoph, 1998. Avoiding Politics: How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life. Cambridge University Press, 1-22.

  1. Title 1
    0
    Title 1
  2. Poster
    1
    Poster
  3. Poster 2
    2
    Poster 2
  4. Talk
    3
    Talk
  5. Charlie & Juan
    4
    Charlie & Juan
  6. Lino & Zelene
    5
    Lino & Zelene
  7. Audience
    6
    Audience
  8. Panel 2
    7
    Panel 2
  9. panel 3
    8
    panel 3
  10. Title 10
    9
    Title 10
  11. Audience 2
    10
    Audience 2
  12. Audience 4
    11
    Audience 4